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Healthier Homemade Mini Pizza "Lunchables"

If your kids are taking lunch from home to school, you may be running out of ideas.  I know I am!  Sandwiches and wraps get old after a while, you know?


When looking for inspiration, many parents cross paths with a product known as Lunchables.  You know, the cool pre-made lunches sold at grocery stores?  The ones your kid begs you to buy every time you pass them in the store?  The ones that are highly processed and over-priced?  We pass on those, but I'm not above trying to copy them myself.



Our version of pizza lunchables uses tiny tortillas rather than a yeast based dough, so they can be made quickly.  If you soak your grains, be sure to leave the baking powder and salt out until after the dough has soaked; you can then knead them in when you are ready to cook the tortillas.  If you don't soak your grains and have no idea what I'm talking about, that's okay, just make the recipe as instructed below.



Mini Pizza "Lunchables"

Makes enough for 2 lunches

Ingredients:

1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 tablespoon butter or lard
6 Tablespoons water or milk
Marinara sauce
Pepperonis
Shredded cheese

1.  In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, and salt.  Cut in butter until lumps are gone.

2.  Pour in water or milk.  Knead dough together until smooth.

3.  Heat a skillet over medium heat; do not grease.

4.  Divide dough into 8 balls.  Using your fingers, flatten the dough balls into circles.



5.  Place dough circles in skillet and cook a couple minutes on each side.  Remove from pan to rack to cool.



6.  Once the crusts are cooled, pack them in a container for lunch.  Also pack containers of marina sauce, some pepperonis, and some shredded cheese.

7.  To eat the mini pizzas, just spread some marina sauce onto the crusts and top with pepperoni and cheese.

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